Symphony of Seattle

(password is seattle )

City Symphonies were among the earliest film experiments. Film makers in London, Berlin, and Russia created paeans to the majesty of their towns at the height of urban industrialization in the early 20th century. These symphonic explorations stand as documents of their time, capturing the space, the smoke, the feel of these places. As a cradle of two of the most defining developments of our current age, mass air transit and the digital revolution, Seattle is a harbinger of the new millennium. Symphony of Seattle will explore how topography, architecture and technology interact to create culture in one of the most beguiling post-industrial cities of our time.

Let There Be Light on Pier 86

We propose to remix video submitted by Citizen Artists of Seattle to project on the side of the granary buiding. We will mix this work with time-lapses of Peter Bill, and paint from workshop participants. I have run workshops like this, and at live events on three continents. With Seattle participation we can build a large following for this work.

River, voice, time

Godfrey Reggio, when he gave the keynote lecture for the Gila River Time-lapse Film Festival a couple of years ago (First Time-lapse film festival in North America!), talked about what a keynote is, namely the musical note that binds a piece of music together. Perhaps in the same manner, a work of art can be that keynote, that pulls together a sense of place and distills it so it may be apprehended by an observer if not in its totality of resolution and complexity, yet in a manner that at least points the way to these deep passes, shaded gullies, minnows, spiders, muck, and the rocks between your toes that is an experience of the Gila River.

We have been working some time on this, the planning stretching back a couple of years. In its current iteration, River Voice Time consists of 2 parts:
a claycrete Oja vessel, that contains projections on mist, fragrant distillations of river herbs and clay, and the stories of *you* our friends who have taken on the voice of the river, to embody it and give it concrete power that is human will;
and a CNC cut table with a projected history of the geographic quadrant that eventually contains the Gila river watershed region going back 4 Billions years in time.

Projecting onto mist, with river perfumes to embed the experience in  memory

Digging in the river to collect the clay really connected us to the land the river carves through. That slippery clay that slicks your tires on a dirt road after a rain is great building material.

Fabbing the claycreate Oja, with Kate Brown Mibreño clay activist and animator

We had been working and collaborating in our three corners of the country (NYC, Seattle and the Mimbres)- getting together for a couple of weeks in Santa Fe was absolutely key, and we thank SFAI for hosting us as part of their water rights residency.

Creating Olfactory experiences with master perfumer Stephen Dirkes

The other half of our installation is our terrain map table. I have been researching the manner in which to use a CNC machine, essentially a big router on a robot arm you can use to carve and cut pieces of wood, metal, and plastic. Suffice to say there are 15 different ways using 25 different 3d apps that can possibly do this. Finally I was able to get a cut at Make Santa Fe, with the fantastic help of Zane and Stefan at Make Santa Fe, Catherine at Extraordinary Structures, and Jeff Boyd, GIS specialist. (blog post to come as to my particular recipe for achieving our terrain map)

Cutting Topography of the Gila Watershed with übergeek and New Media guru Peter Bill

Finally, we had been working on content to project on the table, and Kate created our stunning animations to bring the history to life.

Kate Brown speed drafts-woman creates Calderesque animations.

This project had the help of many good people! The Hotsprings Ranch for hosting us, SFAI for sponsoring our residency, and The Gila Conservation Coalition for making this all happen, among many others. I would like to thank my Collaborators, Allyson Siwik, Kate Brown, and Stephen Dirkes for being so inspiring and awesome and such hard workers that they inspired this laggard to actually get some things done. The Gila is worth all of the hard work we put towards keeping it free, just as our spirits are free. However there are many deep interests in Grant Co and New Mexico that just want that water, and with our future of climate change, this fight to keep the wildness alive will not end in our lifetimes, nor those of our children.

River Voice Time will be open starting September 21st as part of the Gila River Festival

After that who knows?

Woodstock and Gimme Shelter

Good post on films we have been watching this semester in Documentary film, by Grad student Jennie Joy:

If Woodstock was the Apex of the Hippie movement, then Gimme Shelter was the Antithesis. For Woodstock it was 3 days of Peace, Love, & Understanding (and drugs & music) set in the laid back and beautiful NY countryside. The dream bubble so many youth had been riding, was popped one December night at Altamont Raceway in Livermore, California. Four months after Woodstock came Altamont, and the two couldn’t be more different. Some say that fateful night at Altamont was the loss of innocence for a generation, the final days of 1969 segued into a darker time, it was as if the hopes, dreams and philosophies of that generation died with Meredith Hunter.

Source: Woodstock and Gimme Shelter

POPUP a New Media Festival 2/18-19

new media
PoP uP a new media festival

Pop New Media Festival
Hosted by New Media iDEAlab, MRAC, WILL, and WNMU
2/18-19

Keynote Lecture:
Shadowpeople
Cannon Hersey
2/18 6:30 PM Parotti Hall
Main campus WNMU
Cannon Hersey is a photographer, fine artist and organizer of large-scale cultural efforts in non-traditional spaces in New York City, Sao Paulo and Johannesburg. He is committed to connecting art and the public in unique and unexpected ways to explore the meaning of race, religion, culture and commerce in the modern global world.

Everything Wearable Technology Demo/workshop
2/19 4pm  McCray 118
Cost $50 for circuitboard/lights/you will take
something lighted and wearable home.

New Media Performance:
2/19 8 pm Parotti Hall
Featuring work, performances and improv by: Barry Moon, Dawn Chambers, Doug Nottingham, Jessica Rajko, Kate Brown, Vance Galloway, Zoe Wolf,  Peter Bill, WNMU students and others!

Film 1: Nanook of The North

This was the first look into the Inuit world.  It essentially was the first documentary made.  In the early 1900’s Robert J. Flaherty went on an expedition to the Canadian Arctic by the Hudson Bay.  During his time spent with the Inuit people (whom he referred to as Eskimos) he documented the experience with a Bell-Howell Camera and a portable developing and printing machine.  During expeditions between 1910 and 1913 Flaherty compiled enough footage to put together a short film.  The film burned and Flaherty decided to go back with a film crew and recapture what he had lost of raw footage.  1914 through 1916 Nanook was created.  I say created instead of filmed to make the differentiation between the earlier raw film and the product of direction that was the footage used in the final cuts.

Source: Film 1: Nanook of The North

Border Art

I wrote an article for Desert exposure. It was a punchy little piece, but obscure editing decisions, and sloppy layout rendered it somewhat illegible. Here is a corrected version, please read this one!

desert-exposure-article

We have been getting lots of good press lately!

Much thanks for everyone who participated and helped!

This is for the JuarezX show, with interview of Sarita Cordelero (translated by the ever awesome Dr. Lydia Huerta):

juarezX-press2

This is for Landscape of the Gila, and the Gila Time-lapse Film Festival. Interviews of Casey Kiernan, Stephen Dirkes, Godfrey Reggio, Christin Necker, Victor Masayesva, and petit moi. I spent AGES agonizing over the art for the Gila River Fest poster, and then at the last minue, came up with the hand image for the cover of Desert Exposure…
So much thanks to Allyson Siwik, and Donna Stevens who work SO hard every year to make this happen.

gila-river-press!

The Gila River Festival Art Show, 9/25/15

Phoebe has written an excellent review of the Landscape of the Gila show:

“Ripples” – by Penny Flick, encaustic

The first thing that caught my attention was the color of this piece. It’s a very appealing blend of greens and blues and browns. I think the addition of the two sets of angled, parallel lines of contrasting colors enhances the overall design and effect of the work.

I’ve not seen many encaustics, so found this work unique on that basis alone. The waxen texture and three-dimensionality are marvelous. I also like how the waxy medium/encaustic continues onto the four edges of the stretched canvas.

I don’t know enough about encaustics to critique the craftsmanship and technique of this piece, but it certainly looked superb to me. I think the work would inspire other artists to try this medium; there would seem to be limitless potential in it. Plus it simply looks like great fun.

 

Source: The Gila River Festival Art Show, 9/25/15

The contested landscape of New Mexico

This is a current that runs through much of my work- you need to go to these fraught landscapes, where people’s histories clash, and talk and try and understand the granularity of the violence that marks every square inch of North America, Europe and Asia…

Race and history in New Mexico are contested in a way unique to the United States. This has to do with discrete historical events that took place in the Land of Enchantment and the layers of conquest the state deals with today. What you had in 16th century New Mexico was a lot of small, semi-sedentary tribes (the Puebloan peoples) with some larger, raiding tribes on the edges like the some of the Apache groups and the Navajo. When the Spanish sought to expand their control north of the central Mexican silver regions, they followed the same basic trail that indigenous people used in their trading networks, going up the Rio Grande and originally establishing a capital at what the Spanish would later term San Juan Pueblo (unlike the other Pueblos, the people of San Juan have reclaimed their indigenous name and now are referred to as Ohkay Owingeh. This just happened in the last few years). The Spanish were led by Juan de Oñate, a would be next-Cortes or Pizarro who hoped to find gold and silver farther north. When Oñate arrived in New Mexico, he kicked the Ohkay Owingeh out of their homes, expected the native peoples to feed and house and work for them, and basically treated them like conquered people. When they resisted, he responded harshly, particularly at Acoma Pueblo. On a mesa west of modern-day Albuquerque, the Acoma had a great natural defense and thus took a major toll on the Spanish forces. But the Spanish eventually conquered Acoma. Several hundred Acoma were killed. More notoriously, Oñate ordered a foot cut off of all men over the age of 25 to show Spanish resolve, although only 24 actually received this punishment. The Acoma were sent into slavery, although they eventually returned and the pueblo exists today.

From the excellent blog Lawyers, Guns, and Money: http://www.lawyersgunsmoneyblog.com/2015/09/race-and-history-in-new-mexico